TALKS PROGRAMME

June Talk

We would like to thank John Lindop for his talk on Kirkheaton in the Middle Ages, 1066-1216; unfortunately a combination of the good weather and the World Cup reduced the attendance.

July Talk

Film Night – “The Kirkheaton Collection” by Maurice Broadbent, Thursday, the 26 July 2018, 7.30pm at the Kirkheaton Community Centre.  Entrance only £2.50 (including light refreshments).

This will be a fund raising evening for Kirkwood Hospice.  As such the entrance fee and money raised from raffles etc will be donated to Kirkwood Hospice.

Come along to see

  • Kirkheaton and the Coronation:
  • Victorians
  • Church
  • Mock Wedding
  • Old Folks’ Party
  • Kirkheaton Coronation Celebrations
  • Kirkheaton Coronation Parade
  • Fancy Dress etc.
  • Kirkheaton Carnival 1968
  • Jubilee Celebrations 1977
  • The Pewter Teapot (Kirkheaton Co-op 1934)
  • Kirkheaton Jubilee Celebrations 1935

 

FAMILY HISTORY

The group continues meet every Thursday from 6.00pm at the Kirkheaton Library and is available to help with all things Family History.

 

How to avoid errors when ordering BMD certificates

This article is from

https://lostcousins.com/newsletters2/endjun18news.htm

There’s nothing worse than spending out £9.25 on a certificate from the GRO, waiting for it to arrive, then finding out that you’ve ordered the wrong one – and yet it’s a mistake we’ve all made in the past.

Prior to 6th April 2010 the GRO offered a service where you would pay £3 (or was it £3.50) and they’d check each entry in a list until they found that matched the criteria you specified. You’d pay the normal cost of the certificate plus the checking fee for each entry they’d checked – it was a sort of insurance policy.

But in 2010 somebody in the corridors of power re-read the legislation and realised that there was no authority to charge for this service – on reading the announcement most people assumed that it had been discontinued. But it hadn’t been discontinued – it just worked a bit differently. And best of all, it was now free!

There is a limit in that the GRO will only check a maximum 6 entries – which might possibly cause a problem if you’re searching for someone with a very common forename/surname combination.

It’s not a problem you’ll run into very often, because you have to specify the registration district, and they’ll only search three years (the year you specify and one on either side). Even ‘John Smith’ tends not to show up more than 6 times in a 3 year period, at least not in the registration districts I checked. (You might, however, run into a problem if you’re searching for a ‘John Jones’ in Wales, because in some parts of Wales a quarter of the inhabitants are called Jones.)

It’s not a foolproof solution – the GRO will stop searching as soon as they find an entry that matches the criteria you specify, so you may never know that there was another matching entry. On the other hand, if you’re too specific you might be told the entry can’t be found, even though there’s a ‘near match’.

Are You a Family Historian or a Name Collector?

The question is… “Why do we study genealogy?”

What makes anyone so curious about his or her family tree? What drives us to dedicate time, effort, and sometimes expenses to go find dead people?

What is it inside of us that makes us spend hours and hours cranking reels of microfilm, and then we go home and report to our family members what a great day we had?

There are two different kinds of genealogists. There are name gatherers, and then there are family historians.

For full article

https://blog.eogn.com/2018/06/06/are-you-a-family-historian-or-a-name-collector/

blog.eogn.com
I have a question. None of my living relatives knows the answer to this question. I have not found the answer to this question in any public records, nor have I been able to find the answer in cemeteries. I have read a few magazine articles and Internet pages about the topic, but none of them have …

 

RESEARCH PROJECTS

Are you interested in becoming in helping in any of our research projects?

Charles Brooke Diary 1775-1776

John Brooke (Charles’s father) bought Daw Knowle in 1756. Charles moved out to Colne Bridge House (demolished to make way for Mamas to Papas), he had built in 1776.

The Group has been given a transcription of this diary plus two storage boxes full of background research.

Kirkheaton Parish Church

Rev Richard Steel has provided the Group with copies of his research into the history of Kirkheaton Parish Church.

Audio/Video Interviews

For this project to progress, we desperately need you to get in touch to let us know someone (young or not so young), who would like to be interviewed about their life and experiences.  Please get in touch before it is too late.

We can provide a video/audio copy of the interview for you to keep in your “Memory Box”.

Photographs/Films/Videos

Have you photographs, films and or videos relating to the Parish of Kirkheaton then please get in touch.

Our aim to build up a collection and make them readily available.